Furniture Polish

Let’s talk about Pledge, Old English, etc. They make your furniture look beautiful and shiny. They moisturize the wood and keep it ageless. They are also filled with toxins that affect eyes, ears and the upper respiratory system. There are cheaper options that are 100% natural.

Regardless of what type of furniture you have, when you “polish” it, you should be doing two things: cleaning and conditioning. If your furniture is wood veneer then you don’t really need a lot of oil to moisturize the piece, but you still want to clean off the dirt that settles in. If you have solid wood furniture, though– especially antiques– you will want to make sure that you use a good oil to condition the wood. I use olive oil because it’s affordable and good quality. (I’ve also heard that jojoba oil is good for furniture polish but I can’t attest to this because I have not tried it.)

I am including several “recipes” here with notes about how/when to use each one:

Recipe #1: Olive oil and lemon oil
This is the furniture polish I use primarily. The majority of the furniture in our home is antique so I work very hard to keep it preserved.

1 small spray bottle
1/2 cup olive oil
20 drops of lemon essential oil (orange oil is nice, too)

Instructions: Spray on wood surfaces and wipe thoroughly with a clean cloth. Optional step: Wait five-10 minutes and buff with a clean cloth before placing any fabrics on the wood surface afterward.

Benefits of this recipe:
The citric acid in the lemon oil draws out dirt, clarifies wood and keeps the oil that soaks in the wood from going rancid. The heavy concentration of oil provides deep conditioning for older woods.

Recipe #2: Vinegar and olive oil
If you have faux wood or wood veneer furniture, this will be a better polish for you.

1 small spray bottle
1/2 cup apple cider (or distilled white) vinegar
1 Tbsp olive oil

Instructions: Shake solution thoroughly before each use and spray on surfaces. Wipe with a clean cloth.

Benefits of using this recipe:
The acid in the vinegar draws out dirt to leave the surface very clean. No buffing necessary so it saves you a step. Cheap, cheap, cheap!!

Recipe #3: Lemon juice and lemon oil
Some of you might really long for that “fresh smell.” This recipe will provide you with that nice smell but still cleans and conditions your furniture.

1 small spray bottle
1/2 cup of lemon juice
15-20 drops of essential lemon oil

Instructions: Shake solution thoroughly before each use and spray on surfaces. Wipe with a clean cloth.

Benefits of using this recipe:
Very fresh smell. The acid in the lemon juice draws out dirt to leave the surface very clean. No buffing necessary so it saves you a step.

Each of these recipes should last 2-3 months in the spray bottle.

Price Comparison: (at Wal-Mart)

Pledge Aerosol- Lemon Scent: $3.97
Old English Aerosol- Lemon Scent: $3.79
Recipe #1: $2.15
Recipe #2: $0.31
Recipe #3: $0.71

I’m always looking for new ideas! Do you have a furniture polish recipe you’d like to add here?

Love, Heather

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About Heather

Hey, you can have a safe, natural and healthy home without being a barefoot hippie. I'm a high-heel wearing, non-hybrid driving, full-time working (from home) mother of two.
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One Response to Furniture Polish

  1. Pingback: I love Olive Oil « Natural (but Normal)

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